The Energy Saving Shop helps | Madagascar Project

The habitat of the ring-tailed lemur – and thereby one of the most important ecoregions in the world – is threatened by destruction.

Did you know...

... that the baobab tree can store up to 140,000 litres of water?

... that the ring-tailed lemur living in Madagascar, one of the oldest types of lemurs, feeds almost exclusively on the fruits from this tree?

... that the baobab can live for up to 5,000 years?


The baobab is an important source of food for animals and humans.

Seven out of the ten known types of baobab appear in Madagascar and are almost the only food source for the ring-tailed lemur. This is the oldest kind of lemur and they live only in Madagascar. Ring-tailed lemurs eat the fruits from the baobab tree (pronounced: Buhubub). They digest the shell and the pulp around the seed which are then excreted. This is how birds, which eat the excrement of the ring-tailed lemur, spread the seeds and contribute to the conservation of the baobab.

The baobab trees are not just a source of food for the ring-tailed lemur; they are also used in a variety of ways by the local inhabitants. The white, edible pulp of the fruit contains vitamin B, C and calcium, making it very healthy. The leaves of the tree are also edible and contain protein and vitamin C. The bark of the baobab can be used to make clothing, ropes, nets, mats, baskets and much more. The roots can be made into a powder by grinding, which is needed to manufacture glue and soap. In a nutshell: The baobab is an important economic supply source for humans, ring-tailed lemurs and a wide variety of birds which nest exclusively in the crown of the tree, such as the cape parrot.

Exploiting natural resources is threatening the survival of the animal world

Unfortunately, in the last few decades almost 90% of the forest area has been cut down for fire wood and to make space for grazing land and rice cultivation. The disappearance of the forest means that the habitat of the majority of animals that are only found in Madagascar is destroyed.

The WWF promotes the protection of the national parks in Madagascar and other declared conservation areas as well as environmental education in schools and communities. This takes place as part of a national environmental education programme and in cooperation with the Madagascan government. The community should learn how to treat the environment properly, for humans and animals.

 
You will find more information about the WWF project at
https://www.wwf.de/spenden-helfen/fuer-ein-projekt-spenden/madagaskar/

 

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